Champion is Champion

Posted: April 3, 2013 in Fiction
Tags: , ,

Not blogged for a while, sorry folks. Been writing see? Lots of lovely words. Okay, there has been some wandering around the wintry landscape with my improbable dog, and some whisky, and some painting of Orks… But mostly, hard, hard grafting. Today, something happened to push all my ego buttons and send me back here. Being all puffed up like, I figured I’d share.

A few weeks ago, Damien G Walter launched his annual Scifi Hunt, where he throws out an invitation to authors and independent publishers to submit their work for examination on his Guardian column. He had 800 submissions this year, and chose five of them.  Champion of Mars was among them! Here’s what he had to say:

Guy Haley’s Champion of Mars celebrates all that is best in the pulp tradition of SF and fantasy. A clear homage to the Barsoom novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs (poorly adapted to film last year as the confused John Carter), there’s also a strong flavour of British “space opera” in Champion of Mars, with flourishes of Iain M Banks and Michael Moorcock. Guy Haley interweaves two timelines, one a near-future Hard SF narrative, the other a far-future planetary romance, both focused on the looming red presence of Mars. Simply put, Guy Haley is a very good writer, with an infectious love for sci-fi that shines off every page of his pulp-inspired prose. If there is one author in this list who might write a Game of Thrones-scale hit in future, it’s Haley.

Go right here to see Damien’s other four picks: The Vorrh, by Brian Catling; The Theatre of Curious Acts, by Cate Gardner; Adrift on the Sea of Rains by Ian Sales; and his favourite, A Pretty Mouth, by Molly Tanzer.

Much respect is due to Damien for, firstly, doing this in the first place —there’s precious little publicity for indie authors, and every good word counts — and secondly, wading through his forty-score submissions.

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Comments
  1. Michael Grey says:

    Grats, Guy. Damien does put in the hard yards for his work at the Guardian, and is not averse to calling a spade a spade, so his praise is truly worth shouting from the rooftops. Shedtops. Whatever tops are near to hand.

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